Participative note-taking during a meeting

Last modified by yves boisselier on 2013/10/03 11:58

Ref: http://lite.framapad.org/p/vom0OGV83w 

This curriculum aims at training adult trainers in developing courses where they coach their audience (students/trainee...) to take actively part in co-report the content of a meeting with online collaborative note-taking.

This content can be : 

- Decisions,

- Minutes, 

- Ideas (brainstorm)

The curriculum will introduce three different types of tools to help audience identify best uses for each : 

PAD, wikis, googledocs, see diffrent strenghts and weaknesses here : 

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0Apfy6yGvVRcGdDBXcC13aGM1aldQbE5CNklUWWlWUGc#gid=0

type of webtool TimeParticipants Chat/discussion ConnexionPlugins 
mediawiki, Xwiki and other GPL-based wiki tools   asynchroneous editing unlimited discussion pages urls and links Numérous
PADs like etherpad  synchroneous editing with color tracking 16 chat standalone None. KISS
 Google "docs" synchroneous editing  ? chat + annotation system may link to other googledrive project 

Step 0. CONTEXT & TOOLS

Ideally, the trainer will chose a real topic for the meeting, for example :

* Working group coordination meeting (committee, general assembly, piloting team..)

* Brainstorming on a future action (promotion campaign, planning 

* Online teleconference

Material  required

Personal computer

Internet connexion

* Beamer

STEP 1 - CONTEXT

The trainer set up the context 

1. Will explain the goal of the session: discovering new tools to facilitate note taking and dissemination of final notes. Meanwhile, also discovering the benefits of co-writing and discussing the merit of collective decision making.

2. It may be a real meeting or simulation of a real meeting

3. Trainer explains which are the goals of the meeting (providing information, making decisions; listing tasks; brainstorming etc.) and the expected outcomes.

4. Trainer attribute roles for participants (facilitator; time keeper). She may also attribute attitudes to further support the role play (etnthousiastic supporter, devil advocate; etc.)

STEP 2 – PREPARATION OF THE MEETING : USING GOOGLE DOCS

2.1 preparation prior to training session.

Prior to the session, the teacher will have prepare a little document posted on google docs to be read by students before the official meeting start. It can typically be a bit of documentation needed to support decision making. 

For example, if the goal of the meeting is to decide between three companies to visit, the googledoc may feature a quick presentation of each of the three companies. 

The teacher send a link to a google doc to all trainees.

 

2.2 study of the google doc alone

The students are asked to do as if they were in their office alone before the meeting. 

The teacher send them a link to the google docs. Each student is asked to (alone) read the document and to annotate it (droping questions or notes) to prepare the meeting.

Students are invited to answer other students question left on the googledoc.

Students are left to experiment by themselves alone for a while.

 

2.3 debrief

After some 10-15 mn, debriefing session. The teacher ask students questions such as

* how did you feel when using that tool ? (lost, confident, happy, very nervous etc.)

* what happened ? did you find your way ? did you annotate the document ? Did you answer other participants questions ?

* what did you learn ? 

* how does this related to the real world (comparison with their usual practices such as annotation of a word document received by email)

* what if ? (we had used another mean such as an common email to all of you rather than the google doc)

* what is next ? What do you want to learn more ?

2.4 more training on google docs by demo

Go back to google doc for a live demo of its features (different types of file, access to the files, sharing options, history of documents)

Points to think of

- synchronous editing possible but not easy to track

- only one document, but related/groups possible

- anotation feature

2.5 allow students to experiment further

Individually on the same document. Ask them to create a document, to make a couple of changes, to look at history, and to share it with others.

STEP 3 – DURING THE MEETING

3.1. Using a pad to support the meeting

The trainer send a link to an etherpad session, created for the training

It is used for coaching the participants step by step, to write down minutes of the meeting.

The trainer kickstart the meeting (or rather... ask the chair to do so). 

All the participants are invited to contribute in co-editing the pad, based on the inputs of the participants (they can add links, modify the text, transcript in a written form the guidelines given by the teacher.

They can also start chatting in the chat of the pad.

Make sure that at least one decision be made and recorded. 

 

3.2. Debriefing

In a similar way than above.

* how do you feel ? (lost, confident, happy etc.)

* what happened ? reflect in particular on how notes were taken and on how the vote took place and was recorded on the pad. Are the notes complete ?

* what did you learn ? 

* how does this related to the real world (such as one person taking handwritten notes during the meeting, writing them doing on Word afterwards, sending them by email for approbation one month later)

* what if ? we had used google docs.... differences with the previous tool ? Do you know other tools ?

* what is next ? What do you want to learn more ?

Points to think of

- synchronous editing great

- only one document

- chat feature

- color feature

3.3 voting trends in collaborative environment (optional)

Open discussion on various voting systems

 

3.4 Intellectual property and collective production

Open discussion on intellectual property rights within a collective text (in particular outline the benefits the tracking who added what and when in terms of legitimacy, transparency and attribution)

 

3.5 more training on etherpad by demo

Go back to etherpad for a live demo by the teacher of its features (login/color, sharing options, history, access rights)

 

3.6 allow students to experiment further

Individually on the same document. Or on another pad. Ask them to create a new pad, to make a couple of changes, to look at history, and to share it with others.

STEP 4 – AT THE END OF THE MEETING

4.1. Open discussion on options for setting up an archive of the minutes

Trainer discuss with trainees on what to do next.. Some examples include

- copy paste and send the minutes by email

- let it there on the pad... (discuss opening own instance of etherpad in the company for more security)

- move it to a knowledge plateform such as a wiki. 

 

4.2. Discovery of a wiki and demo by the trainer

What is it ? Which uses ? Discovery of wiki-based projects (eg. Wikipedia). Main features (editable, history, recent changes).

 

4.3 Training on a wiki

Propose a wiki instance.

Propose to copy paste the notes taken on etherpad.

Each student create an account on the wiki, modify a page and explore.

4.4 Debriefing

In a similar way than above.

* how do you feel ? (lost, confident, happy etc.)

* what happened ? reflect on how the transfer between etherpad and wiki was managed

* what did you learn ? 

* how does this related to the real world (how do you currently archives meeting notes)

* what if ? we had used google docs to archive ? Or etherpad ?.... differences with the previous tools ?

* what is next ? What do you want to learn more ?

Points to think of

- great for asynchronous editing. Synchronous editing not practical

- many documents, interlinking between documents. Categorizing

- openness & transparency

- keyfunctions : read, edit, see history, comment, revoke, recent changes

4.5 allow students to experiment further

Individually on the same document. Or on another. Ask them to

* create a wiki page

* to make a couple of changes

* to look at history

* to look at what others are doing, drop them a comment and modify their text

 

STEP 5 : SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION

Participants are divided in groups of 4-5 people maximum. 

They are given a large sheet of paper and asked to draw a visual summary of what they learned and will remember. Words not allowed.

Teacher proposes a roundable to collect participants final feedback

Students are asked to make personal commitments.

Created by Miguel Alarcón on 2012/11/02 14:50

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